100 meters up from the main entrance, the main road used to part the south and north part of the jungle from left to right. This area is where the south part of the jungle began with restaurants and food stores. It was one of the liveliest part of the camp. 
       
     
 2 years old Adile and his friend playing in the dirt. After the south part of the jungle was forcefully evacuated with bulldozers, many families had to relocate in the north part of the camp.
       
     
   2 years old Adile From Afghanistan inside his current trailer home. Some volunteers come by daily to check on him and his parents. 
       
     
  Children from Afghanistan by their trailer home in the north part of the jungle. They occupy their day by playing in the sandy dune or learning French at the school next door run by volunteers.
       
     
 A little girl from Afghanistan playing with a yoyo near by her trailor home.
       
     
 2 children next to their trailer home. Many families have built extensions made out of wood and plastic covers. Children tend to be around each other all day long since most of the trailers are close together in a small area.
       
     
 Volunteers have built a small playground for the children. This one includes a slide and swings, children spend a lot of time on it.
       
     
 The age of the children currently living in this area of the Jungle camp range from 2 to 12 years old. Many have begun to speak some words of French and English.
       
     
 Ahmed and his friends from Kuwait. They have been living inside this wooden shack located in the north part of the jungle since fall 2015. Being safe from the removal of the south part, their temporary home is still intact. 
       
     
 Ahmed and his friends are still currently trying to cross over England regularly.  A friend watching Ahmed dance without his glasses since they were broken by the police while attempting to cross over illegally.
       
     
 Ahmed dancing, celebrating his friend Issa who recently succeeded crossing over to England. 
       
     
 Haider and his friend who recently arrived in the jungle. Haider and his two other cousin, Haidi and Zeeshan from Pakistan have been living in the north part of the jungle  since late summer 2015.  While applying for asylum in France, they are still waiting for a response since my last visit.
       
     
 Haidi and Zeeshan looking at a French statement of a friend from Iraq. This one states the asylum confirmation process under the Dublin convention.
       
     
 The jungle life still remains as it was a couple months ago in the northern part. Some Shia Pakistani friends of Haidi, Haider and Zeeshan.
       
     
 The south part of the jungle which was evacuated by bulldozers, the path still goes to the St. Michael´s church (the first church built in the Calais Jungle during the summer of 2015). It was the only place in the south part that the authority did not remove.
       
     
 Care 4 Calais is an organisation created by independent volunteers. It brings cultural and sport activities for the jungle migrants. 
       
     
 Since the the south part has plenty of empty space. Care 4 Calais uses it for sport activities such as football matches.
       
     
 These activities make a difference in the daily life of the migrants. It brings joy and a sense of community.
       
     
 Inside the containers area. Even though the containers are surrounded by fences, migrants are free to come in and out as they please. Many continue to live their lives as if they would in the Jungle, just with more security and comfort. Playing volleyballs helps to have fun and pass the time.
       
     
 Inside one of the containers where a few friends from Afghanistan live together. In each containers there are twelve beds where all have to share this common area to sleep in.
       
     
  Bashir (one the left) & his friends from Afghanistan in the newly built containers of the Calais Jungle. Before coming to the Calais jungle, Bashir was in Norway for 17 months where he applied for asylum as a refugee being persecuted by the Taliban. He received two negative answers in the process. According to Bashir, his letter of rejection stated that "he could go back to Afghanistan and be safe if he apologise to the Taliban"
       
     
 Each containers are numbered to keep a certain organisation and track of each individual living inside.
       
     
 The night falling. Many will stay warm but the containers are only a temporary solution to a bigger issue. With the English borders still refusing to take in any migrants, the population of the Calais jungle is still growing where many still hope to reach England.
       
     
 100 meters up from the main entrance, the main road used to part the south and north part of the jungle from left to right. This area is where the south part of the jungle began with restaurants and food stores. It was one of the liveliest part of the camp. 
       
     

100 meters up from the main entrance, the main road used to part the south and north part of the jungle from left to right. This area is where the south part of the jungle began with restaurants and food stores. It was one of the liveliest part of the camp. 

 2 years old Adile and his friend playing in the dirt. After the south part of the jungle was forcefully evacuated with bulldozers, many families had to relocate in the north part of the camp.
       
     

2 years old Adile and his friend playing in the dirt. After the south part of the jungle was forcefully evacuated with bulldozers, many families had to relocate in the north part of the camp.

   2 years old Adile From Afghanistan inside his current trailer home. Some volunteers come by daily to check on him and his parents. 
       
     

 2 years old Adile From Afghanistan inside his current trailer home. Some volunteers come by daily to check on him and his parents. 

  Children from Afghanistan by their trailer home in the north part of the jungle. They occupy their day by playing in the sandy dune or learning French at the school next door run by volunteers.
       
     

Children from Afghanistan by their trailer home in the north part of the jungle. They occupy their day by playing in the sandy dune or learning French at the school next door run by volunteers.

 A little girl from Afghanistan playing with a yoyo near by her trailor home.
       
     

A little girl from Afghanistan playing with a yoyo near by her trailor home.

 2 children next to their trailer home. Many families have built extensions made out of wood and plastic covers. Children tend to be around each other all day long since most of the trailers are close together in a small area.
       
     

2 children next to their trailer home. Many families have built extensions made out of wood and plastic covers. Children tend to be around each other all day long since most of the trailers are close together in a small area.

 Volunteers have built a small playground for the children. This one includes a slide and swings, children spend a lot of time on it.
       
     

Volunteers have built a small playground for the children. This one includes a slide and swings, children spend a lot of time on it.

 The age of the children currently living in this area of the Jungle camp range from 2 to 12 years old. Many have begun to speak some words of French and English.
       
     

The age of the children currently living in this area of the Jungle camp range from 2 to 12 years old. Many have begun to speak some words of French and English.

 Ahmed and his friends from Kuwait. They have been living inside this wooden shack located in the north part of the jungle since fall 2015. Being safe from the removal of the south part, their temporary home is still intact. 
       
     

Ahmed and his friends from Kuwait. They have been living inside this wooden shack located in the north part of the jungle since fall 2015. Being safe from the removal of the south part, their temporary home is still intact. 

 Ahmed and his friends are still currently trying to cross over England regularly.  A friend watching Ahmed dance without his glasses since they were broken by the police while attempting to cross over illegally.
       
     

Ahmed and his friends are still currently trying to cross over England regularly.  A friend watching Ahmed dance without his glasses since they were broken by the police while attempting to cross over illegally.

 Ahmed dancing, celebrating his friend Issa who recently succeeded crossing over to England. 
       
     

Ahmed dancing, celebrating his friend Issa who recently succeeded crossing over to England. 

 Haider and his friend who recently arrived in the jungle. Haider and his two other cousin, Haidi and Zeeshan from Pakistan have been living in the north part of the jungle  since late summer 2015.  While applying for asylum in France, they are still waiting for a response since my last visit.
       
     

Haider and his friend who recently arrived in the jungle. Haider and his two other cousin, Haidi and Zeeshan from Pakistan have been living in the north part of the jungle since late summer 2015. While applying for asylum in France, they are still waiting for a response since my last visit.

 Haidi and Zeeshan looking at a French statement of a friend from Iraq. This one states the asylum confirmation process under the Dublin convention.
       
     

Haidi and Zeeshan looking at a French statement of a friend from Iraq. This one states the asylum confirmation process under the Dublin convention.

 The jungle life still remains as it was a couple months ago in the northern part. Some Shia Pakistani friends of Haidi, Haider and Zeeshan.
       
     

The jungle life still remains as it was a couple months ago in the northern part. Some Shia Pakistani friends of Haidi, Haider and Zeeshan.

 The south part of the jungle which was evacuated by bulldozers, the path still goes to the St. Michael´s church (the first church built in the Calais Jungle during the summer of 2015). It was the only place in the south part that the authority did not remove.
       
     

The south part of the jungle which was evacuated by bulldozers, the path still goes to the St. Michael´s church (the first church built in the Calais Jungle during the summer of 2015). It was the only place in the south part that the authority did not remove.

 Care 4 Calais is an organisation created by independent volunteers. It brings cultural and sport activities for the jungle migrants. 
       
     

Care 4 Calais is an organisation created by independent volunteers. It brings cultural and sport activities for the jungle migrants. 

 Since the the south part has plenty of empty space. Care 4 Calais uses it for sport activities such as football matches.
       
     

Since the the south part has plenty of empty space. Care 4 Calais uses it for sport activities such as football matches.

 These activities make a difference in the daily life of the migrants. It brings joy and a sense of community.
       
     

These activities make a difference in the daily life of the migrants. It brings joy and a sense of community.

 Inside the containers area. Even though the containers are surrounded by fences, migrants are free to come in and out as they please. Many continue to live their lives as if they would in the Jungle, just with more security and comfort. Playing volleyballs helps to have fun and pass the time.
       
     

Inside the containers area. Even though the containers are surrounded by fences, migrants are free to come in and out as they please. Many continue to live their lives as if they would in the Jungle, just with more security and comfort. Playing volleyballs helps to have fun and pass the time.

 Inside one of the containers where a few friends from Afghanistan live together. In each containers there are twelve beds where all have to share this common area to sleep in.
       
     

Inside one of the containers where a few friends from Afghanistan live together. In each containers there are twelve beds where all have to share this common area to sleep in.

  Bashir (one the left) & his friends from Afghanistan in the newly built containers of the Calais Jungle. Before coming to the Calais jungle, Bashir was in Norway for 17 months where he applied for asylum as a refugee being persecuted by the Taliban. He received two negative answers in the process. According to Bashir, his letter of rejection stated that "he could go back to Afghanistan and be safe if he apologise to the Taliban"
       
     

Bashir (one the left) & his friends from Afghanistan in the newly built containers of the Calais Jungle. Before coming to the Calais jungle, Bashir was in Norway for 17 months where he applied for asylum as a refugee being persecuted by the Taliban. He received two negative answers in the process. According to Bashir, his letter of rejection stated that "he could go back to Afghanistan and be safe if he apologise to the Taliban"

 Each containers are numbered to keep a certain organisation and track of each individual living inside.
       
     

Each containers are numbered to keep a certain organisation and track of each individual living inside.

 The night falling. Many will stay warm but the containers are only a temporary solution to a bigger issue. With the English borders still refusing to take in any migrants, the population of the Calais jungle is still growing where many still hope to reach England.
       
     

The night falling. Many will stay warm but the containers are only a temporary solution to a bigger issue. With the English borders still refusing to take in any migrants, the population of the Calais jungle is still growing where many still hope to reach England.